Dewey Bridge and SR-128

We recently completed a round trip between Arizona and Colorado and had the opportunity to drive along Utah SR-128, a designated Scenic Highway. I was reminded of our first trip down this road and crossing the Dewey Bridge.

Dewey Bridge - 1983
Dewey Bridge – 1983
Castle Valley, Utah.
Castle Valley, Utah.

That was in November 1983 and we were on our way from Denver, Colorado to the Grand Canyon. I remember stopping and getting out of the car in amazement and wondering if the bridge was safe. Well, there was no turning back at this point so across the bridge we went. The first photo was taken just before we drove across. As I recall, the highway had some unpaved segments at that time.

There was a lot of snow on that trip and the buttes and mesas were gorgeous.

Dewey Bridge - 1988.
Dewey Bridge – 1988.
Fisher Towers sunset.
Fisher Towers sunset.

A later visit was in April 1988. The new bridge was in place and the Dewey Bridge was now closed to vehicles but you were welcome to walk across it. We fixed a dinner in the Fisher Towers picnic area (there was no campground at that time) and were treated to this colorful sunset on the towers.

Much has changed since then. The highway has more traffic. The picnic area was replaced by a campground and it is busy. There are additional campgrounds farther downstream where once there were only faint pullouts along the side of the river.

In 2008, the Dewey Bridge burned and it was the end of an era. Jim Stiles wrote about it in High Country News.

All photos were shot on Kodachrome 64 film. Yeah, those were the days!

 

Moonrise over Grand Canyon

The late February full Moon presented an opportunity to photograph the Moon rising between the dramatic Wotans Throne and Vishnu Temple in Grand Canyon.

Moonrise between Wotans Throne and Vishnu Temple in Grand Canyon.
Moonrise between Wotans Throne and Vishnu Temple in Grand Canyon.

Moonrise was about a half-hour before sunset. This meant that the distant walls of the canyon would still be illuminated by late afternoon Sun. On the other hand, the eastern horizon was still pretty bright as the Moon rose from behind Wotans Throne. So bright, in fact, that it was difficult to see the Moon. As a result, I got better results about 15 minutes later as the Sun moved lower and the Moon moved higher in the sky.

Moonrise with Earth's shadow over Grand Canyon.
Moonrise with Earth’s shadow over Grand Canyon.

The second shot was taken just a minute or two before sunset and only the uppermost portions of the canyon rim remain illuminated by the sun. In addition, Earth’s shadow can be seen just above the horizon.

Several groups of hikers ascending the South Kaibab Trail in Grand Canyon.
Several groups of hikers ascending the South Kaibab Trail in Grand Canyon.

Bonus shot: While waiting for the Moon to rise I took photographs of hikers ascending the South Kaibab Trail just below and above Ooh-Aah Point.

Skiing in Skunk Canyon

In late January we had many days of snow with over 40″ falling in about 11 days. What a great chance to ski down Skunk Canyon. I’ve been here many times walking, running, and mountain biking—but never skiing.

Skiing down Skunk Canyon near Flagstaff.
Skiing down Skunk Canyon near Flagstaff.

In the morning, it was quite cold—the overnight low temperature was +9°F—and the snow was very dry; Swix Blue Extra Wax was perfect for getting a bit of grip and a good glide. There was a broken trail part of the way into the canyon but mostly we had untracked snow and broke our own trail.

Fisher Point with snow.
Fisher Point with snow.

At the point where Skunk Canyon briefly gets very narrow everyone but me turned around. I had never been to Fisher Point in the snow and I was probably not going to get another chance for a while so I continued. There were some old, snow-covered ski and snowshoe tracks here and folks had probably come in via Walnut Canyon and the Arizona Trail. But no one else was there while I visited.

Ski tracks in Skunk Canyon.
Ski tracks in Skunk Canyon.

I turned around to retrace my steps and within a few minutes was having issues with the rapidly warming snow sticking to my skis. I was no longer able to glide and several inches of heavy snow were clumping to the bottom of the skis. Wow! This was going to be a long slog back to the car. I was pretty tired when I finished and the deep powder was already a distant memory.

And that’s what skiing in Flagstaff is like. Once the storm ends and the sun comes out there is only a very brief window of a few hours. Get it while you can.

Coyote Buttes and The Wave

My first and only visit to Coyote Buttes and The Wave was in June 2004. A coworker had permits for two back-to-back days but was unable to use them. The BLM permit system was quite different then from what it is now. Getting multiple-day permits was not unusual. Nowadays, getting a permit at all requires a fair bit of luck and perseverance.  I consider myself fortunate to have had a chance to visit this amazing location.

Coyote Buttes North.
Coyote Buttes North.

We arrived at the trailhead in mid-day with temperatures, as I recall, in the upper ’90s. It was mid-June and the North American Monsoon and rainy season had not started. Even so, there were clouds and a few rain showers in the area.

Pools of water near Coyote Buttes.
Pools of water near Coyote Buttes.
Narrow passageways at Coyote Buttes.
Narrow passageways at Coyote Buttes.
Textured landforms at Coyote Buttes.
Textured landforms at Coyote Buttes.

We hiked out to the rocks and made good time arriving in the late afternoon. There were a few other visitors but they left after a short time and we had the place to ourselves for the next several hours. Really—there was no one else there. Hard to believe!

Drifted sand at Coyote Buttes.
Drifted sand at Coyote Buttes.
Clouds and showers develop around Coyote Buttes.
Clouds and showers develop around Coyote Buttes.

We wandered around for hours taking photographs and picnicking and enjoying the solitude. For a few brief moments, one of the rain showers produced a rainbow but I was too slow to move the camera gear and get the shot.

Clouds drift away and the sun returns in late afternoon at Coyote Buttes.
Clouds drift away and the sun returns in late afternoon at Coyote Buttes.
Afternoon sun makes shadows on the walls.
Afternoon sun makes shadows on the walls.
Surfing The Wave.
Surfing The Wave.

As the sun dropped in the west and temperatures began to cool we finally left and began the hike back to the car. Somewhere along the way we realized we were on a different trail—or perhaps no trail at all—but our starting point was still obvious and we continued on.

Flower petals in sand.
Flower petals in sand.
Late afternoon light illuminates the rocks on our hike out of Coyote Buttes.
Late afternoon light illuminates the rocks on our hike out of Coyote Buttes.
The old sign showing trails to Coyote Buttes and Buckskin Gulch.
The old sign showing trails to Coyote Buttes and Buckskin Gulch.

The next morning we decided we did not want or need to hike out there again so we did not use our 2nd day permit. Instead, we travelled down Buckskin Gulch—a place we had heard about but not yet had a chance to explore. It was a great hike and we did not regret our choice.

Here are photographs (shot on Fuji Provia slide film and recently scanned) from the afternoon that we spent at Coyote Buttes and The Wave.

Hiking Pumphouse Wash

Pumphouse Wash is a canyon that is ignored by most of the people who drive past it every day. It is located in the upper reaches of Oak Creek Canyon right at the bottom of the well-known switchbacks. No matter—its best quality is that very few people hike it.

Canyon walls are reflected in a pool in Pumphouse Wash.
Canyon walls are reflected in a pool in Pumphouse Wash.

During heavy rains and snow melt there will be water flowing down the canyon. Otherwise it’s a dry wash with a series of pools. The canyon is narrow with steep walls. It’s full of boulders strewn in the stream bed that have been washed down in great floods. The plethora of boulders makes hiking in this canyon a slow, arduous process. One must hop from rock to rock for miles.

A shady location for a lunch break in Pumphouse Wash.
A shady location for a lunch break in Pumphouse Wash.
Upper section of the narrows in Pumphouse Wash.
Upper section of the narrows in Pumphouse Wash.
The narrows in Pumphouse Wash.
The narrows in Pumphouse Wash.
Lower section of the narrows in Pumphouse Wash.
Lower section of the narrows in Pumphouse Wash.

But the rewards are worth the effort. You won’t encounter many other hikers. Maybe even none. And there are beautiful pools and narrows if you travel far enough up the canyon. Late in the spring the pools are still deep and clear and inviting enough for swimming. By early summer, however, they have warmed and filled with algae and, maybe, not so inviting. Timing is important.

Columbines in the deep shadows of Pumphouse Wash.
Columbines in the deep shadows of Pumphouse Wash.

So we recently hiked up from the bottom of the switchbacks up to the confluence with a small side canyon that comes in from the east. No name is given on the maps for this feature—not to be confused with James Canyon farther upcanyon. This is about 2 ¼ miles from the start and it took us about 2 ½ hours. That’s less than one mile per hour. There was no one else around—although we could hear hikers farther downstream owing to the echoes off the canyon walls. We stopped in the shade and had a leisurely lunch followed by a swim in one of the deeper pools. And then back in the shade for more lounging.

Clear, blue skies are reflected in the waters of a pool in the canyon.
Clear, blue skies are reflected in the waters of a pool in the canyon.

But eventually it was time to go. It was now mid afternoon and the sun had moved around to the northwest leaving us in shade for most of the trip down canyon. Good thing, too, because it had been sunny and hot on the way up and we were worried about running out of drinking water. Also, with the canyon floor in the shade it was easier to take photos of the pools of water and the short section of narrows.

Light reflected from the canyon walls onto a small pool in the canyon.
Light reflected from the canyon walls onto a small pool in the canyon.

And, then, there was that magical moment when the light created a perfect situation. The sun lit up a section of the canyon floor which was reflected upwards to an overhang. The reflected light on this overhang was beautiful—but this illuminated overhang was reflected in a pool of water surrounded by deep shadows. Amazing! Move a little closer and the pool and reflection did not line up. Move a little farther away—same thing. Just one spot—and it was perfect.