Wildflowers and Water in the Desert

Springtime! Most of the snow in the high country has melted and has been moving downstream into the lower elevations and the desert. This means that many of the normally dry washes and low-flow streams now have abundant water in them. In addition, the bountiful precipitation this winter has allowed wildflowers to bloom and populate the desert.

A deep pool in the Agua Fria River.
A deep pool in the Agua Fria River.

We took a day hike down the Badger Springs Trail and then along a section of the Agua Fria River within the boundaries of the Agua Fria National Monument.

Tyler Williams, in his Canyoneering Arizona, has this to say about the canyon:

The Agua Fria is a gem of a desert canyon. The bottom of this canyon is granite, sitting below rocky saguaro-studded slopes beneath a basalt rim. Proceeding downstream, you will be scrambling around, over, and under polished gray and white boulders that surround lovely pools.

Petroglyphs along the Badger Springs Trail.
Petroglyphs along the Badger Springs Trail.

We were disappointed in the wildflowers as there were only small patches here and there rather than the full hillsides of flowers I was hoping to see. On the other hand, there was plenty of water in the river creating deep pools and small cascades as the water plunged over the numerous boulders. The water in the river was not particularly cold so crossing or standing in the water was pleasant. If the air temperatures had been just a bit warmer and without breezy winds we might have enjoyed jumping in for a springtime swim.

Mexican Gold Poppy.
Mexican Gold Poppy.
Mexican Gold Poppy.
Mexican Gold Poppy.
Cascades on the Agua Fria River.
Cascades on the Agua Fria River.
Deep pool on the Agua Fria River.
Deep pool on the Agua Fria River.
Deep pool on the Agua Fria River.
Deep pool on the Agua Fria River.

Beautiful weather, easy hiking, lots of water, and wildflowers. Great day!

Clear Skies Make it a Good Time to View the Zodiacal Light

With exceptionally clear skies it was a good time to capture images of the zodiacal light. Here is what Wikipedia has to say about this astronomical phenomenon.

Zodiacal light is a faint, roughly triangular, diffuse white glow seen in the night sky that appears to extend up from the vicinity of the Sun along the ecliptic or zodiac. It is best seen just after sunset and before sunrise in spring and autumn when the zodiac is at a steep angle to the horizon. Caused by sunlight scattered by space dust in the zodiacal cloud, it is so faint that either moonlight or light pollution renders it invisible.

Zodiacal Light. (28mm lens)
Zodiacal Light. (28mm lens)
Zodiacal Light and light pollution. (16mm lens)
Zodiacal Light and light pollution. (16mm lens)

Both images above clearly show the cone of light extending upward. In the upper portion of both images is the Pleiades star cluster with the planet Mars just below and to the left.

Light pollution from Phoenix makes star viewing a challenge.
Light pollution from Phoenix makes star viewing a challenge.

It’s unfortunate that Arizona’s dark skies aren’t as dark as they could be. Increasing population and expanding cities throws more light into the night sky. And our state legislators seem to think that bright billboards are more important than the dark skies needed by the many telescopes located in the state.

Spring Conditions in Sedona

It’s March and the days are getting longer and warmer. The recent epic snow in Sedona has melted and most of the mud is gone to be replaced by perfect trail conditions. Melting snow from the higher terrain continues to flow down Dry Creek and Oak Creek and the runoff in the creeks is impressive.

Crossing Dry Creek on the new Outer Limits Trail.
Crossing Dry Creek on the new Outer Limits Trail.
High water flows down Dry Creek as seen from the recently rerouted Girdner Trail.
High water flows down Dry Creek as seen from the recently rerouted Girdner Trail.
Bridges can be useful when the water is this high.
Bridges can be useful when the water is this high.
Footprints.
Footprints.
Massive tubr blowout!
Massive tube blowout!

 

Winter Storm in Grand Canyon

A few afternoons ago, I headed up to the South Rim of Grand Canyon. My hope was to catch the nearly-full rising Moon as it appeared from behind Cape Royal on the North Rim. I was successful last year and I wanted to try it again — and get it even better.

A winter storm slowly departs Grand Canyon.
A winter storm slowly departs Grand Canyon.
Late afternoon sun briefly illuminates portions of Grand Canyon.
Late afternoon sun briefly illuminates portions of Grand Canyon.

A winter storm was winding down and there were breaks in the clouds by mid afternoon. But the breaks didn’t happen in the right place or right time to capture the moon rising above Cape Royal.

So it was time to switch to the backup plan and I ended up photographing the clouds and fog that were moving across the canyon along with all the fresh snow on the South Rim.

A Variety of Winter Weather

Flagstaff’s February weather has been very active with rain and/or snow recorded on seven days out of the first fifteen. Several days of snow on the Kachina Peaks covered the trees with a thick coating of rime ice and lots of new snow on the slopes.

Rime covered trees in the Kachina Peaks.
Rime covered trees in the Kachina Peaks.
"Flying Dutchman." It's steeper than it looks.
“Flying Dutchman.” It’s steeper than it looks.
"Allison Clay."
“Allison Clay.”
Weeds in the snow.
Weeds in the snow.

And then we had an “atmospheric river” that produced a significant amount of winter rain with about 1.5 inches falling in the Flagstaff area. The runoff in Oak Creek and its tributaries was impressive.

Pumphouse Wash—a normally dry wash—running at high volume.
Pumphouse Wash—a normally dry wash—running at high volume.
Oak Creek at Grasshopper Point: a popular swimming hole when quieter water prevails.
Oak Creek at Grasshopper Point: a popular swimming hole when quieter water prevails.

And the forecast for the next week or so is a continuation of stormy weather with lots of snow for the higher elevations. I believe the long-anticipated El Niño has finally arrived.