Mountain biking in Sedona—Early Winter edition

It has been a wet December and January with rainfall amounts running well above average across much of Arizona—including Sedona. So we haven’t been riding quite as much as we would like as trail etiquette is to not ride wet and muddy trails because of the potential trail damage.

Still, we’ve managed to get in a few good days with only a bit of mud and snow on the trails.

View of the Cockscomb from Western Civilization Trail.
View of the Cockscomb from Western Civilization Trail.
Narrow tread on Last Frontier.
Narrow tread on Last Frontier.
Soldiers Wash trails.
Soldiers Wash trails.
Courthouse Butte trails.
Courthouse Butte trails.
Aerie Trail on Doe Mountain.
Aerie Trail on Doe Mountain.
Aerie Trail.
Aerie Trail.

Another round of wet weather has arrived and trails will be getting rain and snow over the next few days. It may take awhile before we have dry trails again!

Mountain biking in Sedona—Fall 2016 edition

The weather has been pretty dry across northern Arizona this fall and, as a result, we have done all of our mountain biking in Flagstaff.

But the good and dry weather finally ended and we have found ourselves down in Sedona riding several times since Thanksgiving week. The rain that fell in late November resulted in the trails being in great condition. The dry and dusty trails are now perfectly damp and tacky providing great traction and grip (“gription”). Some folks call it Hero dirt.

A few photos from those days of riding…

Stair step drops on Chuckwagon Trail.
Stair step drops on Chuckwagon Trail.
An alternate line on Chuckwagon Trail.
An alternate line on Chuckwagon Trail.
Mescal Trail.
Mescal Trail.
Action sequence on Canyon of Fools Trail.
Action sequence on Canyon of Fools Trail.
Scorpion Trail.
Scorpion Trail.
Secret Slickrock Trail.
Secret Slickrock Trail.
Easy Breezy Trail.
Easy Breezy Trail.
Adobe Jack Trail.
Adobe Jack Trail.

 

Biking and hiking in Durango

After an early start to the summer rainy season, the pattern reverted back to hot and dry across the southwest. And not just for a day or two but for more than a week. Two weeks, even.

With continued warm and dry weather expected we headed to Durango, Colorado, for a few days of mountain biking and hiking. We already had a few ideas for trails and we figured we’d get more while in town.

On our first day of riding we did the Dry Fork–Colorado Trail–Hoffheins loop with an extension on the Colorado Trail to the local “high point” giving us a total of about 17 miles. There were plenty of wildflowers along the Colorado Trail section along with occasional views of distant peaks. We also saw a family of wild turkey but, as usual, they were easier to see than to photograph.

The start of Dry Fork Trail under a stand of oak trees.
The start of Dry Fork Trail under a stand of oak trees.
Dry Fork and Colorado Trail intersection. The map says this is "unmarked" and "easy to miss." Need to update the map!
Dry Fork and Colorado Trail intersection. The map says this is “unmarked” and “easy to miss.” Need to update the map!

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